Is there a treatment?

The treatment

There are no treatments for the Werner syndroom. But some symptoms may be alleviated and some serious complications can be postponed. The Werner Syndrome is a form that have similar symptoms very similar to those of Progeria in children, except cataract and malignant overgrowth. treatment is therefore about the same.     

Reason for control

If you notice the Werner Syndrome is found there is therefore every reason for regular monitoring, think of half yearly physical examination. To assess whether risk factors for cardiovascular disease, are being sought for a high sugar or cholesterol, this is done by taking blood for a blood test.

The role of vitamine C

A new discovery suggests that the treatment of disorders that cause accelerated aging, specifically in the Werner Syndrome, directly from the family medicine cabinet can be. Scientists have shown that vitamin C accelerated the aging process in mice with Werner's syndrome stops and even reverses. They suspect that this discovery is also applicable to other progeria syndromes. The study clearly shows that healthy bodies and healthy individuals without any health problems require large amounts of vitamin C to their life, especially if they follow a balanced diet and adequate physical exercise. However, organisms and individuals with a mutation in the WRN gene or any gene that is affected by the WRN protein and therefore susceptible to various age-related diseases would benefit from a diet with the right amount of vitamin C.

For the study, the researchers used mice. Some of the mice had a mutated gene responsible for the creation of the Werner syndrome. The other mice were normal. The mice were given extra vitamin C administered in their drinking water. For treatment, the mutant mice fat, diabetic, and she developed heart disease and cancer. After treatment, the mutant mice were as healthy as normal mice and they lived a normal life. Vitamin C also improved the storage and burning of fat, reduced tissue inflammation and reduced oxidative stress in the WRN mice. The normal mice seemed to have no benefit of vitamin C. mutation in the WRN gene or any gene that is affected by the WRN protein and therefore susceptible to various age-related diseases would benefit from a diet with the right amount of vitamin C. For the study, the researchers used mice. Some of the mice had a mutated gene responsible for the creation of the Werner syndrome.